Indonesia & Belgium: Local editions

You too can translate and re-publish our global report

Criminal syndicates in Africa and Asia are working together — and competing — to meet the seemingly insatiable demand for pangolins in China and other markets.

Over the past twelve months, more than 40 journalists in 15 countries and territories have conducted a joint investigation on how illegal pangolin trafficking is leading the species to become extinct.

Today we’re sharing two translations of our global investigative report.

The series was released to the public domain under the Creative Commons’ BY-NC-ND license, making translating and republishing the report simple and free. If you’re interested and have questions, get in touch by responding to this email.


In Indonesia, our colleagues at Tempo Magazine, who uncovered ties between the local drug trade and the trafficking of pangolins, published our global report in Bahasa Indonesia.

Read it here and please share it with friends and colleagues in Indonesia!


In Belgium, MO* Magazine also kindly translated and published our report into Flemish.

You can read it here. Please share it with anyone who might be interested!


We’re currently working on podcasts in English and Chinese language on the pangolin trade and will share them with you when they’re ready for distribution. We’re also still following some leads in parts of Southeast Asia.


One more thing: We’re currently looking for an illustrator for a comic book on our reporting and findings.

If you know an experienced cartoon artist who might be interested in telling the tale of reporters across Asia and Africa jointly investigating wildlife crime, please get in touch at contact@pangolinreports.com or by responding to this email.

Again, we want to publish globally again under a Creative Commons license — to make sure as many people as possible get to see it.


Here are our earlier newsletters: 

IntroductionQ&AChinaCameroonNigeriaMalaysiaThai-Malaysian borderIndonesiaPhilippinesIndiaNepalHong KongVietnamTaiwanChina againour IJNet profile, the investigative storybook in Malaysiaa two-part report from Palawan, and our latest report from Myanmar.

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